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It’s the celestial body closest to the earth and the first thing most people observe when looking at the night sky - the moon! Jeff explores the moon, demonstrates the phases of the moon and why they occur, and shows you how to make oxygen from water ... See MoreSee Less

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Each year, the PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and Pennsylvania Organization for Watersheds and Rivers holds an online public vote to select a River of the Year, and the Lehigh River has been nominated for 2021! The 103 mile Lehigh River is an important part of our region’s industrial history, serves as a valuable place for wildlife and outdoor recreation, and is the cleanest it has been in over a century thanks to several decades of conservation efforts. If you would like to participate in voting for your favorite state waterway, visit pariveroftheyear.org/2021-river-of-the-year/vote-for-a-2021-river-of-the-year/

Photo Credit for image of Lehigh River: Nicholas A. Tonelli
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Friday Arts
TIM PUGH: Environmental Artist
Tim Pugh refers to himself as an environmental artist specializing in sculpture, photography, and found materials. Like other artists we have covered, Pugh is a collector of discarded and found pieces: plastics, detritus, glass, leaves, pebbles, and sticks. He combines these in patterns derived from nature, like fossils, tree bark, or geological processes. For Pugh, the finding of the materials is all about what is available at a certain site, and those materials control structure and color of the compositions.

The sculptures are site specific and remain where he constructs them. They become ephemera that records the process and time of assembly. However, the documentation process is important as well. Pugh photographs his constructions, and these photos become the final record of his art.

The truly interesting part of his work is the beautiful melding of man-made and natural materials. The natural materials are surprisingly colorful and varied, and often contribute to a quirky structure, as well as, background to his work. Seeds, pebbles, leaves, and other natural objects often contain their own intricate patterns, giving the compositions another level to be explored. A radial shape made from fern leaves, or repetitive pine cones with their own intense patterning are examples of motifs in Pugh’s work.

Tim Pugh was educated in Great Britain (Wales and Scotland) and maintains a studio there.
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